Frequently Asked Questions

How much do field trips cost? In-person field trips have a flat fee of $175, which includes a $100 security charge. Please complete this form if you are interested in scholarships for admission fee or for bus transportation. 

Who should attend a field trip? The Center's content and exhibit is tailored to students in grades 6-12 in Washington State and the Pacific Northwest.  At this time, we are not scheduling field trips for schools/groups outside of the Northwest.  Please visit the Association of Holocaust Organizations' (AHO) membership database to find a local center or museum near you. 
Students should have previous knowledge of or lessons about the Holocaust; a field trip does not serve as the first introduction to the topic. The Holocaust Center will provide a guide and lessons to prep and debrief the experience. In addition consider browsing our menu of Best Practices lesson plans for teaching this subject. If additional suggestions or resources are needed, just let us know!

How many students can you accommodate on a field trip? In-person, the Holocaust Center can easily accommodate field trips of 15-50 participants -- that includes students and adults/chaperones. Have more students? We can often schedule multiple back-to-back groups at the Center, so ask us about this option! Numerous downtown Seattle attractions are nearby for group rotations. We suggest a student to chaperone ratio of 7:1.

How long is a field trip? In-person visits should be scheduled for a minimum of 90 minutes. 

How far in advance do I need to schedule a field trip? We appreciate requests that are at least three weeks ahead for in-person -- but will make every effort to accommodate all requests.

What should teachers/students do to prepare? Once the field trip is scheduled, we will send you information to share with your students about expectations, and making the most of an in-person field trip. We will also provide post-field trip debrief suggestions. 

What days are you available for field trips? Monday - Friday from 9am - 5pm.  Some Sunday visits can be arranged, just let us know. 

Can students eat lunch at the Holocaust Center? We do not have the facilities for students to eat lunch at the Holocaust Center.

What should teachers/students bring with them to the Holocaust Center? Students will not be able to bring backpacks/large bags inside – please leave at school or on the bus. Weapons of any kind, including pocket knives and pepper spray, are absolutely prohibited from entering the Center. 

Frequently Asked Questions

How much do Virtual Field Trips (VFTs) cost? Virtual Field Trips are free for all schools and students. 

Who should attend a VFT? The Center's content and exhibit is tailored to students in grades 6-12 in Washington State and the Pacific Northwest.  At this time, we are not scheduling VFTs for schools/groups outside of the Northwest.  Please visit the Association of Holocaust Organizations' (AHO) membership database to find a local center or museum near you. 
Students should have previous knowledge of or lessons about the Holocaust; a VFT does not serve as the first introduction to the topic. The Holocaust Center will provide a guide and lessons to prep and debrief the experience. In addition consider browsing our menu of Best Practices lesson plans for teaching this subject. If additional suggestions or resources are needed, just let us know!

How many students can you accommodate in a VFT? We can accommodate 15-1000 participants on a Virtual Field Trip via Zoom. 

How long is a VFT? The virtual visit is a minimum of 45 minutes, which includes time for Q&A. Please allow for a few extra minutes at the beginning to confirm the connection. 

What happens in a VFT? Our Virtual Field Trips are designed to be interactive and engaging.  Docents and a volunteer or staff member collaborate to present a multimedia experience within our new 3D, interactive scan of the Holocaust Center's exhibit "Finding Light in the Darkness." This VFT experience is immersive and feels as if you are truly inside the Center! It includes images, artifacts, videos, and more -- all primary sources from the Holocaust era. A special emphasis is made on local Washington State Holocaust survivors and their accounts, connecting the Holocaust to the world we live in today, and discussing what students can do to take positive action in their communities. 
There is always time for questions from students, as well as engagement within the chat. 

How far in advance do I need to schedule a VFT? We appreciate requests that are at least two weeks in advance, but will make every effort to accommodate all requests.

What should teachers/students do to prepare? Once the Virtual Field Trip is scheduled, we will send you information to share with your students about expectations, and making the most of a VFT. We will also provide post-field trip debrief suggestions. 

What days are you available for VFTs? Monday - Friday from 9am - 5pm. 

 

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"I believe very strongly this is the most hopeful place in the city."

- Steve Adler, Local Holocaust Survivor

Finding Light in the Darkness - Through stories and artifacts of Washington State Holocaust survivors, the museum’s exhibit engages visitors in this history and challenges them to consider how each person’s actions make a difference.

Visitors can interact with video testimony from local Holocaust survivors, explore artifacts that bring history to life, and learn about local students who are upstanders in their schools and communities.   

Explore Virtually - Enter Now

Special thanks to TPN for creating this interactive virtual exhibit. 

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Exhibit is on display at the Henry and Sandra Friedman Holocaust Center for Humanity, 2045 2nd Avenue, Seattle, WA 98121. 

Please note: The Holocaust Center is closed for renovations November 2021 until late February 2022.   We welcome you to come and visit the Holocaust Center in February! 

 

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At the entrance to the Holocaust Center for Humanity are photos of children who experienced the Holocaust. All are survivors who later moved to the Seattle region, with the exception of one. Come visit and learn more about the stories. Photo by Alan Berner, Seattle Times staff photographer. 

 

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A bookcase opens to reveal a photograph of the stairs leading to Anne Frank's hiding place in Amsterdam during the Nazi occupation. Explore this feature and learn more about Anne Frank when you visit the Holocaust Center. Photo by Alan Berner, Seattle Times staff photographer. 

 

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A memorial to the 6 million Jewish people murdered in the Holocaust and the millions of other victims invites visitors to leave notes, prayers and wishes at the Holocaust Center. Photo by Alan Berner, Seattle Times staff photographer. 

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Train tracks at the Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp in Poland at the Holocaust Center for Humanity. Designed by architects Olson Kundig. Photo by Stefanie Felix. 

This exhibit was supported, in part, by 4Culture/King County Lodging Tax and The State of Washington.

The development and training of museum tour guides (docents) is made possible with the generous support of the Union Pacific Foundation.

 

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Field Trips

Featured Exhibit: "Finding Light in the Darkness" - Grades 6 and up. Through artifacts and stories from local Holocaust survivors, students will begin to understand the history of the Holocaust and that their choices make a difference.  A knowledgeable docent will highlight key stories, artifacts, images, and pivotal events featured in the Holocaust Center's exhibit.  Docents can tailor the material to your class.  The minimum time commitment is 45 minutes.  

Recommended: Request a Teaching Trunk or Artifact Kit to use in the classroom at the same time as your virtual field trip. The docent will reference the replica artifacts in the trunk/kit, and encourage the students to explore the physical artifacts throughout the virtual field trip.

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FAQs & Policies

Please review our full FAQs & Policies for Virtual Field Trips or In-Person Field Trips before scheduling. 

Please submit a  Field Trip request 2 weeks in advance for virtual and at least 3 week in advance for in-person.  At this time, we are not scheduling field trips for schools/groups outside of the Northwest.  Please visit the Association of Holocaust Organizations' (AHO) membership database to find a local center or museum near you.

Questions? Contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

CLICK HERE TO SCHEDULE


The Virtual Field Trip program is made possible thanks to the University District Rotary Club and the Alfred & Tillie Shemanski Testamentary Trust.


Check out the many schools and groups that went on Virtual Field Trips to the Holocaust Center for Humanity in 2020-21! 

 

 

 

 

5-1-16 DedicationByMerylAlcabes1"Our chestnut tree is in full bloom. It's covered with leaves and is even more beautiful than last year." - Anne Frank, May 13, 1944

 

The Holocaust Center for Humanity is honored to have been selected to receive one of 11 Anne Frank Tree saplings to come to the United States. The tree is planted in the Peace Garden at the Seattle Center. 

 

From her only window to the outside world, Anne Frank could see the sky, birds and a majestic chestnut tree. “As long as this exists”, Anne wrote in her diary, “how can I be sad?”

During the two years she spent in the Secret Annex, the solace Anne found in her chestnut tree provided a powerful contrast to the Holocaust unfolding beyond her attic window. And as war narrowed in on Anne and her family, her tree became a vivid reminder that a better world was possible.

Anne’s tree would outlive its namesake by more than 50 years, before being weakened by disease and succumbing to a windstorm in 2010. But today, thanks to dozens of saplings propagated in the months before its death, Anne’s tree lives on in cities and towns around the world.

4-26-16 Anne Frank Tree 8-webHere in the United States, the Sapling Project brought eleven of these precious trees to specially selected locations across the country. The Holocaust Center for Humanity is honored to have been selected to receive one of these saplings. 

After years of special care from Seattle Parks and Recreation, the Anne Frank Tree was planted in the Seattle Center Peace Garden and dedicated to the city of Seattle on May 1, 2016. 


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