Survivor Laureen NussbaumBy Jennifer Wing.  LISTEN

An exhibit about the life of Anne Frank is currently on view at the Holocaust Center for Humanity in Seattle. It’s called, "Anne Frank: A History For Today." When it closes at the end of May, two strong connections to Anne Frank will remain in Seattle.

If you go to the exhibit, you will see large panels, about seven feet tall, lining the walls.They are split in half. The top has photos and text that chronicle the rise of Adolf Hitler, the Nazi Party and the horrors of the Holocaust. The lower half of the panels is all about Anne Frank and her family.

The Frank timeline begins with joyful pictures of weddings, the smiling faces of a young Anne and her sister Margot — happy times. Ilana Cone Kennedy is the center’s education director.

“I like that, because I feel like you kind of need to see where people are before the Holocaust starts in order to understand how their lives change once the world started changing,” said Cone Kennedy.

The exhibit shows how Otto Frank, Anne’s father, made the shrewd decision to leave Germany right away and move to the Netherlands.

“And so the Netherlands didn't come into the war until many years later and so the juxtaposition of the Holocaust history and what’s going on in the Netherlands is really interesting because you see pictures of Anne and Margot on the beach while other people are being deported in other countries.” READ MORE | LISTEN

Anne Frank DiaryWhen my older daughter finished reading chapter 1 of Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl, she looked up at me and said, “I’m so depressed.”

“I know!” I said. “To think such a good writer only had the chance to write this book, and to die like that.”

“Exactly,” she replied.

This weekend I plan on taking both of my daughters to see the traveling exhibit Anne Frank: A History for Today at the Henry and Sandra Friedman Holocaust Center for Humanity in downtown Seattle. On display through May 18, 2016, this exhibit presents a history of the Holocaust through Anne’s life story. (It was developed by the Anne Frank House and is sponsored in North America by The Anne Frank Center USA.

“Even if you know her story, it personalizes her and gives the situational context as she was writing her diary,” says Ilana Cone Kennedy, the center’s director of education.

Frank's story is told timeline style. Each panel is split in half: the top tells Holocaust history while the bottom shows what was happening with the Frank family at that same time.

This is just a fabulous exhibit. I have to tell you, we had so many people come through on our first day,” says Kennedy. “Anne Frank is a universal human figure of this very terrible time period who suffered for no good reason. We’ve made her larger than life, but really she’s just a regular kid, a 13-year-old girl who’s thoughtful and a little annoying and she doesn’t like her mom.”

Although the museum's core exhibit is not displayed while the Anne Frank exhibit is up (read a review here), some artifacts from local survivors are still on display. While the center officially recommends the Anne Frank exhibit for fifth graders and up, Kennedy has seen parents show certain pieces of the exhibit to second and third graders and believes parents can judge if their children are ready to learn some of this story.

“Ultimately, we are learning to respect our differences, how we need to help each other and that our own individual choices matter. We don’t live in our own bubble. We have to extend a hand to each other and speak out when we see intolerance,” says Kennedy.

When you visit, the center’s staff are on hand to give parents and children the contextual context needed to understand Holocaust history. Kennedy encourages parents to ask for resources. GO TO ARTICLE

King 5 Anne FrankSEATTLE -- A traveling Holocaust exhibit which explores the life and death of Anne Frank and challenges visitors to examine their own views of others is making a stop in Seattle.

 

The Holocaust Center for Humanity is hosting Anne Frank: A History for Today through May 18.

 

The exhibit, created by The Anne Frank Center USA, delves into scenes of the Holocaust through Frank’s observations which she recorded as a teenager while she was in hiding in Amsterdam in the early 1940s.

 

“There’s something so human about this story,” said Karen Chachkes, strategic director for the Holocaust Center for Humanity. “She was just a child and her revelations are at once childlike and very, very prescient.” ...READ MORE & WATCH VIDEO

WATCH VIDEO

 

Holocaust survivor: Childhood on the run

By Jennie McGhan

GRANDVIEW — It’s not every little boy who has to run from soldiers looking to destroy him, his family and his entire race. Peter Metzelaar did, however. 
Between the ages of 5 and 10, he was among the millions of Jews in Europe hunted by Nazi Germany. “I was much too young to understand,” Metzelaar told fifth graders at Harriet Thompson Elementary School yesterday....  Read more by clicking on the link below:
http://www.dailysunnews.com/news/2015/dec/08/holocaust-survivor-childhood-run/